[SATLUG] compiling a kernel

Chris Lemire good_bye300 at yahoo.com
Tue Jun 24 21:17:10 CDT 2008


How long does it usually take a Linux user to configure his or her first kernel ready for compiling? I still don't know whether or not to include many things in, have them as modules or not have support for them at all into the kernel. I guess a person will spend quite a while Googling each item to see how it should be configured. The help pages help but still is not obvious for every feature of the kernel whether include, make it a module or not have support for it at all.


--- On Tue, 6/24/08, phn1x <phnx.lists at gmail.com> wrote:

> From: phn1x <phnx.lists at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [SATLUG] compiling a kernel
> To: "The San Antonio Linux User's Group Mailing List" <satlug at satlug.org>
> Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2008, 8:03 AM
> I'd like to add one more factor.
> 
> When it comes to remote exploitation many exploits utilize
> memory addresses
> that are known in the generic kernels. By compiling your
> own kernel you:
> 
> 1) Add to the possibility that public exploit code will not
> work on your
> system because the memory addresses will change
> 2) Can reduce the crap in the kernel that may be vulnerable
> without anyone
> even knowing it (yes there are still a few non public
> exploits).
> 
> On Sun, Jun 22, 2008 at 7:46 PM, Bruce Dubbs
> <bruce.dubbs at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > John D Choate wrote:
> > > After 5.5 years of using Linux
> (Mandrake/Mandriva), I have never compiled
> > a
> > > kernel. I know it would be a good learning
> experience for me, but I've
> > never
> > > found any other reason for doing it.
> >
> >
> > 1. Do *not* change the topic on an existing thread. 
> Start a new
> > message/thread.
> >
> > 2. Do trim non-relevant text when replying to a
> message.
> >
> > To answer your question, there are several reasons for
> compiling your own
> > kernel:
> >
> > a.  For learning as you mention.  Knowing how to do it
> gives you confidence
> > in the process.
> >
> > b.  For efficiency.  A standard distribution takes a
> lot longer to boot and
> > is larger because everything is there.  Testing for
> dozens or hundreds of
> > non-existent devices takes time.  Just compiling what
> you need leads to very
> > efficient systems.  The size is small and the boot
> time is much faster.  My
> > system takes about 20 seconds from power on to login
> prompt.  My kernel is
> > 1.8M (no initrd) with the modules directory at 7.5M (4
> modules - nvidia
> > (7.2M) and vmware).  As a comparison, satlug runs RHEL
> and is 1.4M with
> > initrd 481K and a modules directory of 29M (804
> modules).
> >
> > c.  For testing new stuff that hasn't made it into
> the kernel yet.
> >
> >  -- Bruce
> > --
> > _______________________________________________
> > SATLUG mailing list
> > SATLUG at satlug.org
> > http://alamo.satlug.org/mailman/listinfo/satlug to
> unsubscribe
> > Powered by Rackspace (www.rackspace.com)
> >
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Phn1x - Emh
> http://hamsterswheel.com
> -- 
> _______________________________________________
> SATLUG mailing list
> SATLUG at satlug.org
> http://alamo.satlug.org/mailman/listinfo/satlug to
> unsubscribe
> Powered by Rackspace (www.rackspace.com)


      


More information about the SATLUG mailing list