[SATLUG] Home Cloud?

Robert Pearson e2eiod at gmail.com
Wed Dec 30 03:30:38 CST 2009


On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 11:16 AM, Frank Huddleston <fhuddles at gmail.com> wrote:
> Greetings,
>
>  I'm wondering if there is such a thing as a "Home Cloud": that is,
> cloud-type computing for the home. I might not be using the correct
> terminology, but what I have in mind is kind of the opposite of
> virtualization, although not incompatible with it:
> with virtualization you can run many different types of hosts on one
> physical computer, but with what I have in mind, you'd run many computers
> "as one". Many of us gradually build a kind of elephant's graveyard of older
> computers: could they be yoked together to function something like the
> computing clouds?
> I've seem some things out there that look as though they might possibly deal
> with this kind of computing, like Swarm and Apache Hadoop, but I'm just
> mentioning names: I haven't really looked into them.
> The idea of using multiple computers as one is a really old one, and I know
> lots of things have been tried especially for large computational projects.
> I don't know about home or small business projects, however.
> I'd be interested to see what you all have to say about this: it's of some
> theoretical and practical interest to me.
>
> Regards,
>
> Frank Huddleston
>
> --

By all means "Go For It !!!".
Keep in mind that "cloud computing" is about "Services".
Since "Services" are very competitive the Cost of Delivery is very important.
This means commodity price based computing and economies of scale like
shared hardware resources. Almost anything "virtual" can be a shared
resource.

What services do you have in mind to deliver?
Jeremy mentioned some very useful and interesting ones for the SOHO Cloud.
The other payoff is duplicating commercial cloud offerings for less
money in the SOHO Cloud and the pleasure of learning how to do it.
Hard to put a price on that experience.
Kind of like those commercials where the punch line was "Priceless !".

Robin Harris has an interesting post on StorageMojo.
"2009’s big STORies by Robin Harris on Monday, 28 December, 2009"
<http://storagemojo.com/2009/12/28/2009s-big-stories/>
(8) Tiny server clusters
Instead of putting many virtual eggs in one power-hungry basket, why
not build low-power/low-cost servers that don’t need VM software at
all?
[rdpcomment - perfect for the SOHO Cloud]
Microslice servers achieve availability through cheap redundancy. Of
course, no enterprise salesman will sell them, so if their advantages
prove out the efficiency gap between cloud and enterprise shops will
only grow.

Comment #1 by Tom to this post says:
"I can build a storage system with compression, deduplication, iSCSI,
NFS, CIFS, snapshots and triple parity RAID by downloading free
software and installing it on commodity hardware."

[rdpcomment]
Just delivering this Cloud Storage Service for SOHO use would be interesting.
When, rather than if, USB 3.0 arrives the SOHO video use will jump.
300 MBs at the USB price will make many things possible.

Another interesting SOHO Cloud Service area would be:
"MySpace Replaces Storage with Solid-State Drive Technology in 150
Standard Load Servers"
<http://www.infoq.com/news/2009/12/myspace-ssd>

[rdpcomment - the SOHO Cloud may never need or be able to afford this
expensive SSD.
The SOHO Cloud benefit will be in backups. The current traditional USB
Flash drives are moving up in capacity. A set of these plugged in
could easily be a "write" target of the multi-write Operating Systems
of the future. You can do it now if you want to do the programming.
Once the Flash drive fills you can remove it or write over
non-permanent Information. This requires some Manageware which is best
done with as yet un-written Manageware software. Some traditional
backup software will almost do this now.
Remember, with deduplication as a SOHO Cloud Service the backup and
restore paradigm changes completely from the traditional, historical
one we are all familiar with.]

The Times They Are A'Changin


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